Sunday, November 27, 1864

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Army Events:

Expedition from: Baton Rouge, LA November 27 - December 13, 1864
Expedition to: Bayou Grand Caillou, LA November 19 - 27, 1864
Expedition to: Benton, AR November 27 - 30, 1864
Skirmish: Big Black Bridge, MS November 27, 1864
Operations: Central Arkansas November 1 - 30, 1864
Skirmish: Centreville, TN November 27, 1864
Skirmish: Columbia, TN November 24 - 27, 1864
Expedition from: Fort Craig, New Mexico Territory October 1 - November 27, 1864
Expedition to: Fort Goodrich, New Mexico Territory October 1 - November 27, 1864
Expedition to: Fort Goodwin, Arizona Territory October 1 - November 27, 1864
Expedition from: Fort Wingate, New Mexico Territory November 23 - December 10, 1864
Scout: Fort Wingate, New Mexico Territory November 23 - December 10, 1864
Operations: Fulton, MO November 21 - 30, 1864
Skirmish: Georgia Central Railroad Bridge, GA November 1864
Expedition to: Grand Caillou Bayou, LA November 19 - 27, 1864
Skirmish: Lawrenceburg, TN November 27, 1864
Expedition from: Lewisburg, AR November 26 - December 2, 1864
Expedition from: Little Rock, AR November 27 - 30, 1864
Campaign: March to the Sea, GA November 15 - December 10, 1864
Skirmish: Mississippi Central Railroad, MS November 27, 1864
Expedition against: Mobile and Ohio Railroad November 27 - December 13, 1864
Skirmish: Moorefield,, WV November 27 - 28, 1864
Operation: Nebraska, Against Indians, Nebraska Territory August 11 - November 28, 1864
Operation: Nebraska, Against Indians, Nebraska Territory September 29 - November 30, 1864
Skirmish: New Hope Church, VA November 27, 1864
Siege: Petersburg, VA June 16, 1864 - April 2, 1865
Expedition: Price's Missouri Expedition, MO August 29 - December 2, 1864
Campaign: Richmond, VA June 13, 1864 - April 2, 1865
Campaign: Savannah, GA November 15 - December 10, 1864
Campaign: Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley, VA August 7 - November 28, 1864
Expedition to: Strahan's Landing, AR November 26 - December 2, 1864
Skirmish: Sylvan Grove, GA November 27, 1864
Expedition from: Terre Bonne, LA November 19 - 27, 1864
Operation: Trinity River Valley, CA September 1 - December 4, 1864
Expedition from: Vicksburg, MS November 23 - December 4, 1864
Engagement: Waynesborough, GA November 27 - 28, 1864
Skirmish: Waynesborough, VA November 27, 1864
Expedition to: Yazoo City, MS November 23 - December 4, 1864

(Source: Compendium of the War of the Rebellion Vol. I, p. 660-991. Frederick H. Dyer.)


Naval Events:

An explosion and fire destroyed General Butler's headquarters steamer Greyhound, on the James River, Virginia, and narrowly missed killing Butler, Major General Schenck, and Rear Admiral Porter, on board for a conference on the forthcoming Fort Fisher expedition. Because of the nature of the explosion, it is likely that one of the deadly Confederate coal torpedoes had been planted in Greyhound's boiler. "The furnace door blew open," recalled Butler, "and scattered coals throughout the room." The so-called "coal torpedo" was a finely turned piece of cast iron containing ten pounds of powder and made to resemble closely a lump of coal, and was capable of being used with devastating effect. As Admiral Porter later described the incident: "We had left Bermuda Hundred five or six miles behind us when suddenly an explosion forward startled us, and in a moment large volumes of smoke poured out of the engine-room." The Admiral went on to marvel at the ingenuity which nearly cost him his life: "In devices for blowing up vessels the Confederates were far ahead of us, putting Yankee ingenuity to shame." This device was suspected of being the cause of several unexplained explosions during the war.

Blockade running British steamer Beatrice was captured by picket boats under Acting Master Gifford of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, off Charleston. The prize crew accidentally grounded Beatrice near Morris Island and she was soon a total wreck. In reporting the capture to Secretary Welles, Rear Admiral Dahlgren noted the fact that the blockade runner was captured by small boats and not by seagoing vessels, adding: "The duty is severe beyond what is imagined. In the launches the men may be said to live in the boats, and all of them are, in these long nights, exposed to every hardship of sea, wind, and weather; in the stormiest nights they are cruising around close in to the rebel batteries." The Federal Navy spared no efforts to tighten the blockade now that final victory was coming in sight.

Ram U.S.S. Vindicator, commanded by Acting Lieutenant Gorringe, and small stern-wheeler U.S.S. Prairie Bird, commanded by Acting Master Burns, transported and covered a successful Union cavalry attack on Confederate communications in western Mississippi. Thirty miles of track and the important railroad bridge over the Big Black River, east of Vicksburg, were destroyed. Major General Dana praised the part of the gunboats in the expedition: "The assistance of the vessels of the Sixth Division Mississippi Squadron rendered the expedition a complete success."

U.S.S. Princess Royal, under Commander Woolsey, seized blockade running British schooner Flash in the Gulf of Mexico off Brazos Santiago with cargo of cotton. Later in the day, Princess Royal also captured blockade running schooner Neptune. Woolsey reported: "The vessel was empty, having just lost a cargo of salt, said salt having, according to the master's statement, 'dissolved in her hold.' "

U.S.S. Metacomet, commanded by Lieutenant Commander Jouett, captured blockade running steamer Susanna in the Gulf of Mexico off Campeche Banks. Half her cargo of cotton was thrown overboard in the chase. Rear Admiral Farragut had regarded Susanna as "their fastest steamer."

(Source: Civil War Naval Chronology 1861-1865. pp. I:1-41; II:1-117; III:1-170; IV:1-152; V:1-134. 1971: Naval History Division, Navy Department.)


Additional Information:

The Battle of Columbia, Tennessee. (TN034) (Franklin-Nashville Campaign [September-December 1864]).

(Source: Civil War Sites Advisory Commission Report: Battle Summaries. National Park Service. In The Civil War Battlefield Guide, 2nd ed., 1998. Edited by Frances H. Kennedy.)




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