Thursday, May 28, 1863

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Army Events:

Expedition to: Antioch Church, TN May 26 - 29, 1863
Skirmish: Austin, MS May 28, 1863
Operation: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad April 21 - May 31, 1863
Expedition to: Bear River, Idaho Territory May 5 - 30, 1863
Expedition from: Bolivar, TN May 26 - 29, 1863
Skirmish: Bushy Creek, MO May 28, 1863
Expedition from: Camp Douglass, Utah Territory May 5 - 30, 1863
Expedition to: Camp Wesley, TN May 26 - 29, 1863
Scout: Cassville, AR May 21 - 30, 1863
Scout: Cassville, MO May 21 - 30, 1863
Raid: Clendennin's Raid, VA May 20 - 28, 1863
Expedition from: Corinth, MS May 26 - 31, 1863
Operation: Eastern Shore, VA August 20 - June 3, 1863
Scout: Fairfax Court House, VA May 27 - 29, 1863
Expedition to: Florence, AL May 26 - 31, 1863
Skirmish: Florence, AL May 28, 1863
Skirmish: Fort Gibson, Indian Territory May 28, 1863
Scout: Fort Heiman, KY May 26 - June 2, 1863
Operation: Gloucester Peninsula, VA August 20, 1862 - June 4, 1863
Expedition from: Haynes Bluff, MS May 26 - June 4, 1863
Skirmish: Hernando, MS May 28, 1863
Expedition to: Jasper County, AR May 21 - 30, 1863
Scout: Jasper County, MO May 21 - 30, 1863
Raid: Jones' Raid April 21 - May 31, 1863
Scout: Leesburg, VA May 27 - 29, 1863
Reconnaissance on: Manchester Pike, TN May 27 - 28, 1863
Expedition to: Mechanicsburg, MS May 26 - June 4, 1863
Expedition from: Memphis, TN May 28, 1863
Scout: Newton County, AR May 21 - 30, 1863
Scout: Newton County, MO May 21 - 30, 1863
Expedition to: Niblett's Bluff, LA May 26 - 29, 1863
Operation: Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad, VA May 15 - 28, 1863
Scout: Northwestern Arkansas May 21 - 30, 1863
Siege: Port Hudson, LA May 21 - July 8, 1863
Expedition against: Snake Indians, Idaho Territory May 4 - October 26, 1863
Scout: Snicker's Ferry, VA May 27 - 29, 1863
Expedition to: Soda Springs, Idaho Territory May 5 - 30, 1863
Expedition to: Somerville, TN May 26 - 29, 1863
Siege: Vicksburg, MS May 18 - July 4, 1863
Operation: Vicksburg, MS January 20 - July 4, 1863
Expedition to: Wesley Camp, TN May 26 - 29, 1863
Expedition up: Yazoo River, MS May 24 - 31, 1863



Appointment: Isham Warren Garrott, CSA, to Brigadier General
Appointment: Edmund Kirby, USA, to Brigadier General
Appointment: Major General George L. Hartsuff, USA, assumes command of the Federal 23rd Army Corps
Department Expanded: The Confederate Department of North Carolina is extended to include Petersburg, Virginia, and the Appomattox River
Death: Brigadier General Edmund Kirby, USA, dies in a Washington, D. C. hospital from his leg wound received while commanding a Federal artillery battery, near the Chancellor House, during the Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, on May 3, 1863.

(Source: Compendium of the War of the Rebellion Vol. I, p. 660-991. Frederick H. Dyer; The Chronological Tracking Of The American Civil War Per The Offical Records Of The War of the Rebellion pp. 1-336. Ronald A. Mosocco.)


Naval Events:

Lieutenant Commander J. G. Walker ascended the Yazoo River with U.S.S. Baron De Kalb, Forest Rose, Linden, Signal, and Petrel to capture transports and to break up Confederate movements. Fifteen miles below Fort Pemberton, Walker found and burned four steamers which were sunk on a bar blocking the river. Fire was exchanged with Confederate sharp shooters as the Union gunboats returned downriver. A landing party destroyed a large sawmill, and at Yazoo City brought away a large quantity of bar, round, and flat iron from the navy yard." Walker next penetrated the Sunflower River for about 150 miles, destroying shipping and grain before returning to the mouth of the Yazoo River. Admiral Porter reported to Secretary Welles: "Steamers to the amount of $700,000 were destroyed by the late expedition--9 in all."

Rear Admiral Porter instructed his gunboat squadron that "it will be the duty of the commander of every vessel to fire on people working on the enemy's batteries, to have officers on shore examining the heights, and not to have it said that the enemy put up batteries in sight of them and they did nothing to prevent it." The heavy firepower of the Union vessels--massed, mobile artillery--seriously hindered Confederate defenses and was a decisive factor in battle.

U.S.S. Brooklyn, under Commodore H. H. Bell, captured sloop Kate at Point Isabel, Texas, with cargo of cotton.

(Source: Civil War Naval Chronology 1861-1865. pp. I:1-41; II:1-117; III:1-170; IV:1-152; V:1-134. 1971: Naval History Division, Navy Department.)


Additional Information:

The Battle of Vicksburg, Mississippi. (MS011) (Grant's Operations Against Vicksburg [March-July 1863]).

The Battle of Port Hudson, Louisiana. (LA010) (Siege of Port Hudson [May-July 1863]).

The 54th Massachusetts Volunteers, the first Federal regiment composed of black soldiers, embark from Boston, Massachusetts, for Hilton Head, South Carolina, under the command of Colonel Robert Shaw, USA.

(Source: Civil War Sites Advisory Commission Report: Battle Summaries. National Park Service. In The Civil War Battlefield Guide, 2nd ed., 1998. Edited by Frances H. Kennedy; The Chronological Tracking Of The American Civil War Per The Offical Records Of The War of the Rebellion pp. 1-336. Ronald A. Mosocco.)




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